Tag Archives: USMC

Refining the Future Force

LtGen Glueck Jr. Kenneth CROP

Explaining the USMC’s New Capstone Concept

Lieutenant General Kenneth J. Glueck Jr. is deputy commandant for Combat Development and Integration (CD&I) and commanding general of Marine Corps Combat Development Command (MCCDC), headquartered at Marine Corps Base Quantico, VA. His responsibilities are extensive, including training from boot camp to war college courses and pre-deployment preparation; analysis of potential future challenges and threats; and development of concepts, doctrine, and weapon systems and equipment. In summary, CD&I and MCCDC forge the current and future Marine Corps.

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USMC Energy: Extending the Corps’ Reach

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A conversation with the Director of the USMC’s Expeditionary Energy Office

Colonel Jim Caley served in a number of logistics leadership roles during the 1990s, including deployments to Somalia and the Republic of Korea. After serving as the Operations Officer and Executive Officer for Brigade Service Support Group-1 at Camp Pendleton, Col. Caley deployed as the Executive Officer of Combat Service Support Group-11 to Kuwait and Iraq. After attending the School of Advanced Warfare and serving again in Korea, in June 2006 Col. Caley became the Commanding Officer, Combat Logistics Battalion 13, and deployed to Iraq with 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit. He then spent a year at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces and was assigned to the Pakistan Afghanistan Coordination Cell on the Joint Staff. In July of 2011, Col. Caley took command of Combat Logistics Regiment 1, 1st Marine Logistics Group at Camp Pendleton. In July of 2013, he was reassigned to Marine Corps headquarters as the Director of Expeditionary Energy.

Interview by DoD P&E Editor George Jagels

DoD P&E: In broad terms, what is the purpose of the Expeditionary Energy Office (E2O)? 

Col. Caley: Our job is to lead the Marine Corps’ energy innovation. The USMC has a great history of innovation—whether it’s the development of amphibious operations or close air support. The Corps has been really good at transforming itself when we needed to. E2O finds really cool innovations that give our forces more operational reach and make our Marines more effective. That may be an intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) platform that doesn’t take any gas, hybrid power systems that require half the fuel of current versions, or guiding the development of fuel-efficient armored vehicles.

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Airlift Ready: Vehicles for the V-22

Special Operations Forces (SOF) need multi-functional, mission-critical light utility vehicles capable of conducting rapid ingress/egress and modular enough to redeploy by air at a moment’s notice. The Flyer Gen II and Phantom Badger can both fit in the Osprey—making them necessary mobility pieces for SOF and the Marine Corps.

Tactical Agility, Mission Mobility

GD-OTS was awarded a contract in October 2013 by SOCOM for its non-developmental V-22 Internally Transportable Vehicle (ITV) program. The three-year indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contract is for up to 10 vehicles, with integration and logistical support and training. The total value of the contract is $5.8 million if all options are exercised.

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Optimizing Healthcare for a Maritime Force

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C&CC magazine sat down with RDML Pecha in order to give readers insights into how USMC Health Services views it challenges for the present and future.

Though significantly smaller than the Army, RDML Pecha reminds us the Marine Corps is nevertheless an important expeditionary force always prepared to be sent abroad on short notice for combat operations, and as such faces its own battlefield medicine challenges. Like other services, the USMC must also address trials on the home front. To this end, the admiral also discusses the continued health and healing of garrisoned Marines and Wounded Warriors and the programs—some of which are in partnership with civilians his office is working on to improve their lives.

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Electrons to the Lowest Echelon

The Army and USMC Get Power to Dismounted Troops

By George Jagels

Over the past ten years, American warfighters have become increasingly technologically advanced. More and more soldiers and Marines carry GPS, smartphones, networked radios, nightvision systems, and laptops. These devices give Americans an edge on the battlefield few can match; from long-distances to the darkest night, U.S. personnel talk to and see each other remarkably well. Through this interconnectedness and awareness, the dismounted squad, which the Army has been focusing on beefing up, might be able to achieve a major goal: supremacy over adversaries in the same way U.S. armor and air branches face no peer competitors.

This equipment, however, does not come “free.” With more power, so to speak, comes more responsibility—much of which literally ends up on the backs of soldiers and Marines. Though their capabilities are improved, the overall weight carried by warfighters changed little during the last decade (the soldier humps about 16 pounds of batteries, according to the Army). As a result, the DoD must strive for a near perfect balance: lower weight and greater capability.

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