Tag Archives: U.S. Army

Filling the Lethality Gap

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The Stryker readies for additional firepower.

By Christian Sheehy, TDM Managing Editor

The U.S. Army’s Stryker brigade combat team (SBCT) formation was designed to provide the infantry-based unit with a common vehicle in 10 different configurations. The combination of the varying configurations would enable the SBCT formation to conduct and support many different types of operations.

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Target: Warfighter Health


The Military Operational Medicine Research Program Brings Science to the Soldier

By George Jagels

During the thirteen years of U.S. operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, servicemembers were exposed to psychological and physical strains common to warfare and  yet unique to their wars. Survival rates from combat wounds are currently at their highest levels in history, which is a remarkable scientific and organizational feat; at the same time, concerns over traumatic brain injury and a lack of psychological healthcare as well as scandals at DoD health facilities dominate headlines related to military medicine. Clearly, there is more work to be done.

The DoD’s Military Operational Medicine Research Program (MOMRP) is one joint effort to improve the lives of warfighters in theater and back home. With a mission “to develop effective countermeasures against stressors and to maximize health, performance, and fitness,” MOMRP works to identify issues that affect soldiers now and in the future, resulting in research efforts that will be relevant long after the last American forces have left Afghanistan.

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Clear Sight, Dark of Night

Apache M-TADS

U.S. Army PEO Aviation fields upgrades to AH-64E night ops target acquisition capability.

By Christian Sheehy

Seeking both flight safety and fire control, the Army’s Program Executive Office-Aviation is deploying an optical fire control system for the Apache AH-64E. Called the Modernized Target Acquisition Designation Sight/Pilot Night Vision Sensor (M-TADS/PNVS), a product of Lockheed Martin Corporation, the system provides a significant improvement in operational effectiveness, including flight safety via advanced Forward-looking Infrared (FLIR), optics for pilotage, and targeting sensors.

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PEO SOF Warrior: Acquisition on Target

Advanced-Tactical-Infilitration-Course

How Special Operators Get Their Gear

By Colonel Joseph Capobianco, PEO SOF Warrior

I received the charter for Program Executive Office (PEO) for Special Operations Forces (SOF) Warrior (PEO-SW) on 10 August 2012. The staff and I lead and manage an effective and capable team of ten Program Management Offices with the motto of “Operator Focused: On Time-On Target!” Collectively, these offices are organized and staffed to provide the required acquisition agility to acquire and field SOF-unique capabilities to the SOF enterprise. These capabilities directly enable Special Operations Command (SOCOM) lines of operations: Win the Current Fight; Expand the Global SOF Network; Ensure Responsive Resourcing.

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Effective Mobility Through Precision Immobility

A Skedco litter in action.

A Skedco litter in action.

By Kevin Hunter

Skedco Inc. was founded on December of 1981 for the purpose of manufacturing and marketing the Sked Stretcher System, the first-ever casualty evacuation (CASEVAC) kit. It was and still is a litter in a carrying case with all necessary accessories for rope rescue, a spine immobilizer, the Oregon Spine Splint, and a flotation system that floats the Sked in a nearly vertical position and is self-righting if capsized.

Since the Sked System was introduced and standardized, Skedco has produced many new and innovative products (over 200 and counting). The Sked system was tested for nearly two years before it was standardized in 1986. It is currently the standard battlefield litter.

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Securing the Best: Army Drives Competition for Soldier Radios

Staff Sgt. Shelby Johnson, a squad leader with the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), observes the area around Forward Operating Base Torkham, Afghanistan, while wearing the new Capability Set 13 communications suite.

By Argie Sarantinos-Perrin, PM TR

This article was originally published in the March 2014 issue of Armor & Mobility.

As the Army works to simplify the communications tools that soldiers rely on every day, the Project Manager for Tactical Radios (PM TR) is using innovative ways to procure software-defined radios that keep the complexity “inside the box.”

“Today’s soldiers have grown up with technology that is very advanced, and they expect the radios to connect to the network quickly and be easy to operate,” said Colonel Russ Wygal, project manager for TR. “The radios that we provide must have these features to meet our soldiers’ needs.”

The process of procuring radios has evolved along with the technology itself, and the Army’s latest strategy involves a new acquisition approach that looks to industry to fill a vital role in streamlined radio development and production. Procuring Non-Developmental Item (NDI), or commercially developed products, rather than investing government development resources opens competition to industry partners that can meet government requirements. Vendors can develop radios that use already existing government-owned waveforms that are housed in the Joint Tactical Networking Center (JTNC) Information Repository, in lieu of creating new waveforms. Using non-proprietary waveforms ensures interoperability across the Services, streamlines the development process, supports competition, and promotes greater affordability.

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Securing the Skies: How Will the U.S. Military Fend Off Unmanned Systems?

This article first appeared in the Fall 2013 issue of Unmanned Tech Solutions.

By George Jagels

If they ever existed, the days of an American monopoly on military unmanned aerial systems (UAS) are surely over. While many countries building new systems are NATO members or longtime U.S. allies, some are not: China, Russia, and Iran produce UAS of varying degrees of sophistication. Much like in the recent past, the Pentagon must deal with both a foreign military challenge—at least 76 states now possess UAVs—and a more asymmetric threat. With  growing capabilities of small UAS comes greater access for non-state actors such as terrorist groups and drug cartels. This still-murky asymmetric threat—particularly as U.S. airpower remains unquestioned—presents an interesting challenge for the Pentagon.

Though the services were unable to comment on much of their counter-UAS doctrine and programs, they are developing them. Since 2010, an annual joint exercise called “Black Dart” has tested capabilities on this front. Late last year, the Army held a meeting at Fort Sill, OK, with allied and industry representatives to discuss countering enemy UAVs. The Navy will deploy a laser weapon system designed to destroy missiles and pilotless aircraft to the Persian Gulf next year.
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Artillery Lives

Once described in 2008 as a “dead branch walking,” the artillery arm is primed to regain importance as the Army moves beyond COIN-centric operations.U.S. Army Soldiers assigned to Battery A, 1/319th Field Artillery Regiment from Fort Bragg, N.C. fire the M119A2 105mm towed howitzer during Joint Readiness Training Center rotation 13-09 at Geronimo Drop Zone, Fort Polk La., Aug 18, 2013.